Archives for category: culture

The Economist’s 1843 Magazine is always interesting.

This article suggests that modern British architecture, specifically Norman Foster’s work, has largely created our perception of what the future looks like: curved curtain glass walls, innovative engineering, and integrated minimal structures.

https://www.1843magazine.com/design/how-british-architects-conquered-the-world

Starbucks conceived the strategic concept of “The Third Place” in its early corporate development to describe its brand proposition. In this formulation Starbucks would assert itself into the fabric of daily life not simply as a food and beverage retailer but as a destination where people could satisfy their needs as well as pursue their interests and passions in a comfortable public environment (with free wifi).

It was an updated version of the coffeehouse model that established a third place (after home and workplace) where retail transactions and human experience, connection and interaction could thrive and become the brand’s identity.

https://shift.newco.co/the-third-place-and-the-need-state-of-convenience-98f132b67199

A traumatic week for technology. Facebook is a cracked mirror, driverless cars can kill, and technology equities can crash hard like every other market sector.

The growing backlash against Silicon Valley is a gathering realization that our devices and applications are not simply utopian gateways to unlimited information, utility and convenience, but they’re also potentially addictive objects enabling individual pathologies, privacy intrusions, and social dysfunction.

They are rewiring our brains and reconfiguring our behavior.

https://qz.com/email/quartz-obsession/1235589/

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/04/02/cambridge-analytica-and-a-moral-reckoning-in-silicon-valley

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/12-things-everyone-should-understand-tech-anil-dash/

What should we do when our open and free information and social systems are infected by malevolent actors guided by sinister aims and evil purpose?

A portion of social media has become a trojan horse of deceptive identity and networked propaganda.

John Battelle argues that it is an existential threat to democracy and must be countered and rectified.

https://shift.newco.co/the-automatic-weapons-of-social-media-3ccce92553ad

In our age of disruption economic and social change is transforming behavior, style and work.

As individuals increasingly value “experiences” over fashion, and the nature of work is reinvented by automation, AI and demographics, adapting to the speed and dramatic scope of change promises a traumatic and volatile¬†future.

https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/2018-death-of-clothing/

https://www.1843magazine.com/features/crafting-a-life

http://www.bain.com/publications/articles/labor-2030-the-collision-of-demographics-automation-and-inequality.aspx

https://www.thersa.org/discover/publications-and-articles/reports/seven-portraits-of-economic-security-and-modern-work-in-the-uk

Social media is wrestling with a scam and sham problem.

Intrinsic to the integrity of all media is truth and trust: that who and what is presented and conveyed is real and honest. Agendas and objectives are inevitable but so too must be principle and honor.

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/01/all-followers-are-fake-followers/551789/

Amazon’s automated store is a version of the future. Amazonian in vision and ambition.

Amazon Go and the Future

Looking ahead:

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/609868/18-exponential-changes-we-can-expect-in-the-year-ahead/

The Guardian examines the economics, social dynamics, cultural anthropology and intrinsic goodness of the sandwich.

Britannia rules (the bread…)

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2017/nov/24/how-the-sandwich-consumed-britain

Random conversations with strangers have value.

The emotional benefits of small talk outweigh your fear of being awkward